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A High School Student’s Reaction to the Sandy Hook Tragedy​

On December 15th I was driving down the road on my way to go spend my first day of Christmas break with all my closest peers. A weight was lifted off my shoulders as I thought about all my great plans for winter break and everything I wanted to accomplish in my two weeks of freedom. I let my mind drift off into a land of daydreams as I drove down the wet, slick road.

The sound of my mom’s regular ringtone broke my daydream and I whipped up my phone to answer the unexpected phone call.

“Hey honey,” my mom’s voice sounded shaky through the phone and my heart began to thud as I quickly scanned my brain for what could be upsetting her. “Have you checked the news today?” I told her I hadn’t and she informed me that there had been a shooting the day before.
I expected a couple people injured and I prayed nobody had passed away. My mom works at the hospital where she constantly is busy and she had no time to explain.

When I finally reached my desired destination, I ran into my friend’s house like a bat out of hell. When I reached her computer, my fingers were typing at the speed of light as my eyes scanned the different news pages.  I hadn’t even reached the end of the first sentence when my eyes began to glisten with sadness.

Twenty elementary school students’ and six school staff members’ lives had been taken by some heartless man at Sandy Hook Elementary school in Newtown Connecticut that had no reason to kill other than to just do it.

On December 14th the United States lost twenty young girls and boys. A man took their lives as if it was the easiest thing he’d ever done as he released hell on a classroom of innocent children. This country lost twenty futures, twenty growing minds, twenty sons or daughters and above all twenty friends.

I look at the situation as a high school student who believes that school is one of the safest places for children. People don’t die while they’re at school it just doesn’t happen. School is supposed to be the one place where parents drop their kids off without any fear of something going wrong.

On the Friday morning of December 14th parents dropped off their kids at school like any other morning, they watched them walk to the main entrance or to the main door and they trusted the school with the safety of their children. Little did those parents know that they would lose their kid’s lives to some heartless man at the one place they looked at as the safe zone for their kids.

May we all pray for these poor families that lost a family member on that horrendous winter morning. Rest in peace Dawn Hochsprung, Mary Sherlach, Victoria Soto, Anne Marie Murphy, Lauren Gabrielle Rousseau, Rachel D’Avino, Nancy Lanza, Charlotte Bacon, Daniel Barden, Olivia Engel, Josephine Gay, Ana Marquez-Greene, Dylan Hockley, Madeleine F. Hsu, Catherine V. Hubbard, Chase Kowalski, Jesse Lewis, James Mattioli, Grace McDonnell, Emilie Parker, Jack Pinto, Noah Pozner, Caroline Previdi, Jessica Rekos, Avielle Richman, Benjamin Wheeler, and Allison N. Wyatt.

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